Writing

Current Events and Fictional Stories

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  Maybe it’s macabre, but I think real crime stories are a gold mine for fictional story ideas. I get a lot of ideas from current events and from true crime programs like Cold Case Files and Forensic Files. In my Cold Case Justice series (Drawing Fire, Burning Proof, and Catching Heat), I drew not only from true crime programs, but also from the FBI official website: www.FBI.gov. Real life is a treasure trove of ideas for fictional crimes and criminals. Creating a Realistic Protagonist The character of Brinna Caruso …

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Police Work : Fact or Fiction

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I don’t watch much TV.  One show I do enjoy is Castle. While at a writer’s conference some one made a statement and asked me a question, “But it’s so fake as far as law enforcement is concerned, don’t all the mistakes bug you?” The question brought me back to my writing beginnings. So many times I was told my writing was too much like a police report, just the facts. I wanted realism, but in truth, too much realism can be boring. Yes, I want my stories to be …

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Just The Facts Interview with: Candace Calvert

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Years ago in the police academy, we were taught the five W’s and an H in police report writing. Who, what, when, where, why, and how were the questions to be asked in order to form the framework for a crime report. The best place to start an investigation is with the basic questions, or, ‘just the facts’. In the spirit of succinct report writing, I give you a new feature to my blog a ‘just the facts’ interview with interesting fellow writers and from time to time interesting characters. …

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Just the Facts: Interview with Author Ronie Kendig

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Years ago in the police academy, we were taught the five W’s and an H in police report writing. Who, what, when, where, why, and how were the questions to be asked in order to form the framework for a crime report. The best place to start an investigation is with the basic questions, or, ‘just the facts’. In the spirit of succinct report writing, I give you a new feature to my blog a ‘just the facts’ interview with interesting fellow writers and from time to time interesting characters. …

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A Simpler Time – Growing up in Mayberry

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Over the years there have been several kids rescued after they’d been kidnapped and held for several years by their kidnapper. Most recently, the three women rescued from the “house of horrors” in Cleveland come to mind. Thankfully, there are a lot of names of the rescued I could list, which doesn’t balance out those who have been lost, but it does give hope for those still missing. My new book, Critical Pursuit, is about a police officer whose mission it is to find kidnapped and missing children. Her back-story …

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A Word or Two About Writer’s Conferences

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When I first started attending Writer’s Conferences, I was brand new to writing stories. All I had under my belt were some badly written short stories and a burning desire to learn if it was even possible for me to write stories people would read. I think I heard about conferences from a writing class. The first one I attended was bumpy and one I will never forget. One published author I spoke to there loved my story idea and pointed out an editor who she was certain I “needed …

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Guest Post Candace Calvert : Of Cops, Nurses, and Full Moons

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Janice and I met in Dallas last fall, at the American Christian Fiction Writers’ annual conference. I’d been sort of stalking her (though I probably shouldn’t confess that in the presence of law enforcement) during the conference. I admire her work and we share a publisher, so I figured we should meet. I couldn’t find her. Then at breakfast on the final day, she introduced herself saying she’d been hoping to meet me. In truth, it makes sense on a much broader scale: cops and ER nurses. They go together …

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Motive

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Why do people kill? In the courts, ascertaining motive or intent is an integral part of the legal process. The determination of a person’s motive can mean the difference between the death penalty, life in prison, a long sentence, a short sentence, and freedom.  When Cain slew Abel there was no hiding his jealous intent from God and God chose the punishment that fit the crime. I watched a program the other night, interestingly about two brothers. One was in custody for killing the other and he claimed that his …

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Is There a Perfect Murder?

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There is a  line from the TV show Castle that goes something like this: “Two types of people sit around and try to think of ways to kill people, psychopaths and mystery writers, I’m the one that pays better.” Since I write suspense and mystery, I too sit around ant try to think of ways to kill people. A question that often comes to mind, Is there a perfect murder? I’m sure people have committed murder and have not yet been caught, but could someone really plan and commit  a …

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Who’s Watching You?

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Before I left police work completely, I worked on a training bulletin for a new technology, Automated License Plate Recognition software. Basically, it was a scanner mounted on the patrol car that would scan license plates while the officer drove and notify him if there was an alert attached to the plate, or if it were a stolen vehicle. I thought this was a great idea. When I worked in a black and white, the only way to run a license plate was to verbally ask the dispatcher to run …

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